Jaime Pineda, PhD

Jaime Pineda, PhD

Professor
Neurosciences

Contact Information

office tel: 858-534-9754
Lab: 858-534-9754
Fax: 858-534-1128
Email: pineda@cogsci.ucsd.edu  
Lab: http://bci.ucsd.edu/ 

Neural basis of social cognition in normal and clinical populations
The underlying theoretical framework for my research is the relationship between brain structure and function, primarily the biological bases of higher-order cognition, including selective attention, decision-making, and social cognition. Furthermore, I am interested in how neurotransmitter systems contribute to stimulus selection, plasticity, and brain synchronization. Another interest is the neuroetiology of addiction and its effects on behavioral performance. I am also involved in applying knowledge about brain states and concomittant electrical signatures to study and use brain-computer interfaces. Of recent interest has been the link between mirror neurons, mu rhythms, and social behavior, such as understanding actions, empathy, and theory of mind.

  1. Oberman, L.M., Hubbard, E.M., McCleery, J.P., Altschuler, E.L., Ramachandran, V.S., and Pineda, J.A. EEG evidence for mirror neuron dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders. Cog. Brain Res., 24(2): 190-198, 2005.
  2. Pineda, J.A. The functional significance of mu rhythms: translating from “seeing” and “hearing” into “doing.” Brain Res. Reviews, 50(1): 57-68, 2005.
  3. Brendan, A. Z. and Pineda, J.A. Effects of SOA and flash pattern manipulations on ERPs, performance, and preference: implications for a BCI system. Int. J. Psychophys., in press, 2005.
  4. Leland, D. and Pineda, J.A. Effects of food-related stimuli on visual spatial attention in fasting and nonfasting normal subjects: behavior and electrophysiology. Clinical Neurophysiol., in press, 2005.
  5. Oberman, L.M., McCleery, J.P., Ramachandran, V.S., and Pineda, J.A. EEG evidence for mirror neuron activity during the observation of human and robot actions: toward an analysis of the human qualities of interactive robots. Neurocomputing, in press, 2005.
  6. Oberman, L.M., McCleery, J.P., Ramachandran, V.S., and Pineda, J.A. EEG evidence for mirror neuron activity during the observation of human and robot actions: toward an analysis of the human qualities of interactive robots. Neurocomputing, 2007, 70, 2194-2203.
  7. Pineda, J.A. and Oberman, L.M. What goads nicotine addicts to smoke: neural daptation and the mirror neuron system. Brain Research, 2006, 1121: 128-135.
  8. Oberman, L.M., Pineda, J.A., and Ramachandran, V.S. The human mirror neuron system: A link between action observation and social skills. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 2007, 2, 62-66
  9. Ulloa, E.R. and Pineda, J. A. Recognition of point-light biological motion: mu rhythms and mirror neuron activity. In press, 2007
  10. Oberman, L.M, Ramachandran, V.S., & Pineda, J.A. Modulation of mu suppression in children with autism spectrum disorders in response to familiar and unfamiliar stimuli: the mirror neuron hypothesis. Neuropsychologia, 2008, 46, 1558-1565.
  11. Pineda, J.A. (Ed.), The Role of Mirroring Processes in Social Cognition. Humana Press, 2008.
  12. Pineda, J.A. Sensorimotor Cortex as a Critical Component of an “Extended” Mirror Neuron System: Does it Solve the Development, Correspondence, Control Problems in Mirroring? Behavioral and Brain Functions, 4, 47, 2008.
  13. Pineda, J.A and Hecht, E. Mirroring and mu rhythm involvement in social cognition: are there dissociable subcomponents of theory of mind? Biol. Psych., 80, 306-314,2009.
  14. Giromini, Luciano, Porcelli, Piero, Viglione, Donald J., Parolin, Laura, Pineda, Jaime A. The feeling of movement: A pilot study on EEG evidence for mirroring activity during the observations of static, ambiguous stimuli in the Rorschach cards. Biol Psych., 85, 233-241, 2010.
  15. Singh, Fiza, Pineda, Jaime, Cadenhead, Kristin S. Association of impaired EEG mu wave suppression, negative symptoms and social functioning in biological motion processing in first episode of psychosis, Schizophrenia Research, 130: 182-186, 2011.
  16. Leland, D. and Pineda, J.A. Selective attention as a mediator between food motivation and disposition to act. In Preedy, V.R., Watson, R., and Martin, C.R. (Eds.), International Handbook of Behavior, Diet and Nutrition. 2011.
  17. Pineda, J. A. On the spectrum: Does neurofeedback training affect mind-blindness? In: Horizons in Neuroscience Research. Volume 6. Editors: Andres Costa and Eugenio Villalba, pp. 1-19, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2011.
  18. M. C. Keuken, A. Hardie, B. T. Dorn, S. Dev, M. P. Paulus, K. J. Jonas, W. P. M. Van Den Wildenberg, J. A. Pineda. The Role of the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus in Social Perception and its Implications for Autistic Spectrum Disorder: an rTMS Study. Brain Research, 1383: 196-205, 2011.
  19. Moore, A., Gorodnitsky, I. and Pineda, J. A. EEG mu component responses to viewing emotional faces. Behavioural Brain Research, 226, 309-316, 2012.
  20. McGarry, L. M., Russo, F. A., Schalles, M. D., and Pineda, J. A. Audio-visual facilitation of the mu rhythm, Exp. Brain Res., in press.
  21. McGivern, R.F., Adams, B., Handa, R.J., and Pineda, J.A. Gender differences in processing movement versus objects: Implications for Higher Cognitive Sex Differences. PLoS ONE, in press.