Timothy Gentner, PhD

Timothy Gentner, PhD

Neurosciences Graduate Program

Department of Psychology

Contact Information

Email: tgentner@ucsd.edu  
Phone: 858.822.6763
Lab Phone: 858.822.1869
Location: McGill 5334

Mailing Address:
University of California, San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive #0109
La Jolla, CA 92093

Lab Website

Neuroethology of vocal communication and audition
Our research takes an integrative, systems-level approach to study the neural mechanisms that govern the sensory, perceptual, and cognitive processing of real-world acoustic signals. We want to know how the brain represents behaviorally important, complex, natural stimuli; what spatial and temporal forms these functional representations assume; how they are learned and remembered; how perceptual representations function in higher-level decision processes; and how the outputs of such processes guide natural behaviors. Our primary focus is on the elaborate vocal communication system in songbirds.

Comins J, Gentner TQ (2015) Pattern-induced covert category learning in songbirds. Current Biology, 25(14):1873-7.

Perks K, Gentner TQ (2015) Subthreshold membrane responses underlying sparse spiking to natural vocal signals in auditory cortex. European Journal of Neuroscience, 41(5):725-33.

Comins JA, Gentner TQ (2014) Temporal pattern processing in songbirds. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 28, 179-187.

Kozlov A, Gentner TQ (2014) Central auditory neurons display flexible feature recombination functions. J Neurophysiology, 111, 1183-1189.

Jeanne, JM, Sharpee, TO, Gentner, TQ (2013) Associative learning enhances population coding by inverting inter-neuronal correlation patterns. Neuron, 78(2): 352-63.

Jeanne JM, Thompson JV, Sharpee TO, Gentner TQ (2011) Emergence of learned categorical representations within an auditory forebrain circuit. Journal of Neuroscience, 31(7): 2596-606.

Gentner TQ, Fenn KM, Margoliash D, Nusbaum HC (2006) Recursive syntactic pattern learning by songbirds. Nature, 440:1204-1207.

Gentner TQ, Margoliash D (2003) Neuronal Populations and single cells representing learned auditory objects. Nature, 424, 669-674.