Viola Störmer, PhD

Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology

Contact Information

Location: McGill Hall

Mailing address:
University of California, San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive MC 0109
La Jolla, CA 92093-0109

Email: vstoermer@ucsd.edu
Website

Multisensory Integration and Perception

Our research aims at understanding the cognitive and neural mechanisms of human perception, attention, memory and multisensory processing. We focus on identifying and characterizing people’s perceptual and cognitive abilities, as well as their capacity limitations. To do this, we develop experiments that allow us to measure behavioral performance and neural activity of healthy human subjects at the same time. We capitalize on a variety of EEG (electroencephalography) methods, including event-related potentials (ERPs), steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), multi-stimulus pattern analysis, and oscillatory brain activity. Our work is guided by the premise that the human brain is designed to handle a rich multi-sensory environment (sights, sounds, tactile sensations and odors) that is populated by complex, natural entities. Thus, to understand the computations and processes involved to process these diverse inputs, it is important to consider the full breadth of incoming information, and to take into account the nature of the neural representations of this information.

Störmer, V.S., Feng, W., Martinez, A., McDonald, J.J., & Hillyard, S.A. (2016). Salient, irrelevant sounds reflexively induce alpha rhythm desynchronization in parallel with slow potential shifts in visual cortex. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 28(3), 433-445.

Störmer, V.S., & Alvarez, G.A. (2014). Feature-based attention elicits surround suppression in feature space. Current Biology, 24(17), 1985-1988.

Störmer, V.S., Alvarez, G.A., & Cavanagh, P. (2014). Within-hemifield competition in early visual areas limits the ability to track multiple objects with attention. The Journal of Neuroscience, 34(35), 11526-11533.

Störmer, V.S., Winther, G.N., Li, S.-C., & Andersen, S.K. (2013). Sustained multifocal attentional enhancement of stimulus processing in early visual areas predicts tracking performance. The Journal of Neuroscience, 33(12), 5346-5351

Störmer, V.S., McDonald, J.J., & Hillyard, S.A. (2009). Cross-modal cueing of attention alters appearance and early cortical processing of visual stimuli. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 106, 22456-22461